Agreeing to not disagree – making all voices heard by consensus


“β„‚π• π•Ÿπ•€π•–π•Ÿπ•€π•¦π•€ π••π•–π•”π•šπ•€π•šπ• π•Ÿ-π•žπ•’π•œπ•šπ•Ÿπ•˜ π•šπ•€ π•€π•¦π•£π•‘π•£π•šπ•€π•šπ•Ÿπ•˜π•π•ͺ 𝕖𝕗𝕗𝕖𝕔π•₯π•šπ•§π•– π•šπ•Ÿ 𝕓𝕠π•₯𝕙 π•”π• π•žπ•žπ•¦π•Ÿπ•šπ•₯π•šπ•–π•€ π•’π•Ÿπ••Β π•¨π• π•£π•œπ•‘π•π•’π•”π•–π•€” || πŸ†ƒπŸ…ΈπŸ…» βœ… Voting may seem the quickest route to a resolution, but it isn’t the best way to enrol everyone. Voting can silence dissenting voices and thwart creativity. βœ… Consensus decision-making leads to broader engagement. No proposal is adopted until every concern is heard, understood and addressed. … increases how much you care for them and view them as people. βœ… A specific model: first, create a core values statement, and measure all practices and procedures against it. Next, develop a “This is how we do it” document.

πŸ“„β–ΆοΈΒ Read the article


πŸ”‘ decision, consensus, voting, community

New hope for social media?


“𝕋𝕙𝕖 π•’π•˜π•– 𝕠𝕗 π•€π• π•”π•šπ•’π• π•žπ•–π••π•šπ•’ π•šπ•€ π•–π•Ÿπ••π•šπ•Ÿπ•˜” || πŸ†ƒπŸ…ΈπŸ…» βœ… Social media offered both opportunity and calamity. βœ… Regrettably, it has resulted in a positively deranged, psychopathic portrayal of human sociality. The more emotionally charged the content, the faster it spreads via the networks. βœ… Facebook and Twitter’s potential demise presents an opportunity to accept their destruction… and allow the emergence of better alternatives.

πŸ“„β–ΆοΈ Read the article

πŸ–₯️▢️ View toot on Mastodon


πŸ”‘Β social media, downfall, opportunity, Mastodon

Random acts of kindness … make the brain more resilient

Key words: kindness, generosity, compassion, neuroplasticity, neuroscience, resilience, Dalai Lama


ABOUT THIS SERIES OF CARDS: β€œMen follow their sentiments and their self-interest, but it pleases them to imagine that they follow reason. And so they look for, and always find, some theory which, a posteriori, makes their actions appear to be logical.” β€” Vilfredo Pareto

The Peter Principle

Key words: Peter principle, hierarchy, incompetence, bureaucracy, management


ABOUT THIS SERIES OF CARDS: “Men follow their sentiments and their self-interest, but it pleases them to imagine that they follow reason. And so they look for, and always find, some theory which, a posteriori, makes their actions appear to be logical.” β€” Vilfredo Pareto

This tyrant now rules the world: our screens

Key words: screen, device, attention, mind, productivity, entertainment, creativity


A restaurant, a waiting lounge, a family dinner: chances are that most people in front of you will be looking at a screen. Mobile phone, tablet, laptop: they grab our attention and hold it in a vice-like grip. The “Feeds”, and the algorithms that drive them, have taken over our minds and our ability to think independently.

In an article in the blog, Infinite Play, Nat Eliason writes about “The locus of entertainment.” He says that avoiding contact with other people and burying ourselves in our own sources of pleasure is not new. We read books and newspapers while traveling in a train or plane. But, something has changed in a major fashion. The locus of entertainment, according to Eliason, has been slowly wrested from within our own choosing and dropped onto our all-pervasive screens.

βœ… Here are the take home messages that I got from this article.

➑️ Backstory: “Screenworld”. We have given up the power to chose for the false luxury of endless choices. Eliason calls this the “screen world.”

➑️ Main idea: “Entertainment muscle atrophy.” Entertainment, until the advent of the Internet, was something we generated. Writing, music, painting, and the performing arts are some common examples.

Today, entertainment has become something that is generated for us. A complex web of data, obtained from our browsing, is mined with powerful tools. Algorithms control the list of choices on offer. Manipulations are made that are well beyond our cognitive capacity. Free will no longer exists.

We surrender totally. As couch potatoes, our “entertainment muscles atrophy.”

πŸ”΄ Eliason warns us that it is a very short, slippery road to “depression, addiction, and asociality.”

➑️ Call to action: Take back control.

There is a solution, Eliason adds, but it is not an easy one. You have to become the master of your devices; take charge of creating your own entertainment. You have to use these tools to build up your internally generated sources of entertainment. The apps and software available today are wide-ranging and powerful. We have never had so much power for creativity and innovation.

βœ… In a single sentence, Eliason’s recommendation would be: Switch from being a consumer to being a creator.

Read the article.